Family courts failing to uphold human rights for victims of domestic abuse, according to Queen Mary report

Family Courts are failing to recognise and protect survivors’ human rights by not giving victims of domestic abuse a safe and fair hearing which is putting their children’s safety at risk, according to a joint report by Women’s Aid and Queen Mary University of London.

30 May 2018

Survivors of domestic abuse face a lack of protections within family courts according to a new report from Women’s Aid and Queen Mary University of London.

The report, “What about my right not to be abused?” Domestic abuse, human rights and the family courts, found that nearly a quarter of suvivors (24 per cent) reported that they had been cross-examined by their abusive ex-partner during court hearings, which breaches survivors’ human right to be free from degrading treatment.

The report also uncovered systematic gender discrimination and a culture in the family courts that silences women by failing to uphold the human rights of survivors.

[From what the report reveals about the bias towards men in family courts, more needs to change than simply stopping abusers cross examining their victims in court, which the government has accepted but delayed enforcing for many months now – see more about the report’s findings here https://www.qmul.ac.uk/media/news/2018/hss/family-courts-failing-to-uphold-human-rights-for-victims-of-domestic-abuse-according-to-queen-mary-report.html.]

The Rape of Recy Taylor


The Rape of Recy Taylor review – vital story of a woman who fought back

❝This harrowing and very instructive documentary from Nancy Buirski is about the remarkable courage of Recy Taylor, a young black woman in Abbeville, Alabama, in the United States. After she was raped on her way home from church by six white teenage boys in 1944, Taylor refused to stay silent like all the other victims of this very commonplace crime.❞

With the help of her community, the case was taken up by the NAACP and no less a person than Rosa Parks spearheaded the campaign . . . Peter Bradshaw, The Guardian, 25 May 2018

In May, BWRAP & WAR hosted a screening of The Rape of Recy Taylor at the Crossroads Women’s Centre.  We were also invited to speak on the panel after a public screening at the Court House Hotel, London . . .  Well worth catching this film if you can.  It definitely begins to spell out how survivors across the US were speaking out and organising together with Rosa Parks and the civil rights movement to expose rape in their communities, by white men, as part of the legacy of slavery.

Brigitte’s daughters arrived safely

Terrific news – Brigitte Nongo-Wa-Kitwa’s daughters landed last Friday (11 May) at Heathrow after an exhausting 10 hour journey from Kinshasa. Brigitte and Cristel from Black Women’s Rape Action Project, who has worked with Brigitte at every stage of her case,

waited anxiously as the daughters were held for an extra hour after other passengers in immigration control.

Finally, the two young women came through the arrival doors and as they saw Brigitte they abandoned their luggage and rushed to wrap their arms around her for the first time in fourteen years!  A luggage alert was only just avoided when her oldest daughter managed to scramble back into the “restricted area” and recover their baggage.

Brigitte and her daughters say a massive “merci beaucoup” to everyone who donated so generously and helped in other ways to make their reunion possible.  They are now on the road to rebuilding new lives together.  The photo attached also conveys this joy of this occasion.